Showing posts with label Fleur Borrelli. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fleur Borrelli. Show all posts

15 June 2014

Looking at psoriasis the nutritional medicine way




by Fleur Borrelli, nutritionist at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy

The skin and the brain are intricately linked. Both produce the same hormones and neurotransmitter substances. In the skin, serotonin should be converted to melatonin which acts as a natural antibiotic and anti-inflammatory. It is no wonder, therefore, that the skin condition psoriasis is linked to both depression and anxiety disorders(1). A lack of nutritional cofactors such as vitamins B6 and B12 may prevent this conversion in a biochemical process known as methylation.

Geographical latitude may also influence incidence of psoriasis as beneficial sunlight is also needed to produce melatonin(2). Overuse of sunscreens and lack of exposure to the sun will also inhibit the production of vitamin D, vitally important for the integrity of the barriers of the body which include the intestinal lining, the blood brain barrier, the synovial lining and of course the skin(3). The function of the barriers is to protect us against pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. They are lined, therefore, with immune cells including B memory cells which remain in communication with each other all over the body. It makes perfect sense, therefore, when treating the skin to also support the gut with probiotic therapy(4).

Another tool in the nutritional medicine toolbox to alleviate psoriasis is the use of adaptogenic herbs. Herbs such as ginseng and rhodiola can be very effective in reducing the detrimental effects of the stress axis. Chronic activation of this axis can be a factor in the over-triggering of the part of the immune system that deals with cellular immunity with the result being the higher cell proliferation that characterises psoriasis(5). As one of a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, it develops when the immune system mistakes a normal skin cell for a pathogen and sends out faulty signals that cause the overproduction of skin cells. An epidemiological link has been found between the consumption of beer and the incidence of psoriasis(6). Beer is made from the gluten-grain barley and other anti-nutrients such as saponins and lectins that can damage the gut and have been linked to autoimmunity(7).

Nutritional medicine offers a multi-system approach to tackling psoriasis. It aims to reduce the damaging effects of stress hormones whilst supporting barrier function and the immune system. Methotrexate is a pharmaceutical drug used in the treatment of autoimmune disease. It inhibits the metabolism of folic acid and so folic acid is often prescribed alongside. Folic acid, routinely used in fortified foods such as bread and supplements, is the synthetic version of the naturally occurring folate. Many of us have a genetic enzyme deficiency that prevents us from being able to convert folic acid into the folate. The result of this is that un-metabolised synthetic folic acid may remain in the bloodstream with undesirable consequences. Nutritional medicine can come to the fore by offering foods forms of folate. Folate is vital for cell division, DNA repair, immune function and cognitive health.


References for 'Looking at psoriasis the nutritional medicine way':

  1. Gunasti S, Marakii SS et al. Clinical and histopathological findings or psoriatic neurodermatitis and of typical lichen simplex chronicus. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereal 2007. July 21 (6): 811-7.
  2. Reiter R.J. The melatonin rhythm: both a clock and a calendar. Experientia 15.8. 1993, Vol 49, Issue 8, pp 654-664.
  3. Kong J. et al. Novel role of vitamin D receptor in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier. American Journal of Physiology. 1 January 2008 Vol. 294.
  4. Ouwehand AC, Tiihonen K, Lahtinen. The Potential of Probiotics and Prebiotics for Skin Health. Textbook of Aging Sin 2010, pp 799-809
  5. Lowes MA, Kikuchi T et al. Psoriasis Vulgaris Lesions Contains Discrete Populations of Th1 and Th17 T Cells. Journal of Investigative Dermatology (2008) 128, 1207-1211.
  6. Schafer T. Epidemiology of psoriasis. Dermatology Vol 212, No. 4, 2006.
  7. Rook G. Hygiene Hypothesis and Autoimmune Diseases. Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology, February 2012, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 5- 15.



For appointments with Fleur at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy, call  020 8789 3881 or send an email to info@putneyclinic.co.uk.


Fleur Borrelli (Nutritionist)
W:Nutrition and superfood
N: Nutrition and superfood newsletters
T: 07766 88 35 22
E: fleur@nutritionandsuperfood.co.uk

05 June 2014

Why we need to help our detoxification systems



By Fleur Borrelli, nutritionist at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy

It is a relatively unknown fact that our body produces its own toxins as part of our normal metabolism. Our intestinal bacteria may also release by-products from metabolism that can be damaging to our health. This is before we even consider the toxins that come in from the environment.

Fortunately we have evolved a complex network of systems to get rid of toxins that have been created internally. The antioxidant system cleverly destroys free radicals during chemical reactions in our cells before they can damage the cell itself.

The liver, amongst its multitude of tasks, will take a toxic molecule which is generally fat soluble and transforms it into a water soluble molecule to be excreted out of the body in urine via the kidneys. Even fat soluble molecules can be shifted into bile which is then squirted into the intestine and ejected from the body in faeces. Sweating can lose any heavy metals lurking about, not to mention the shedding of toxins via skin, hair and nails.

This is what happens when all is working well... But we now live in a modern environment where we are being overloaded with toxins We have plastics in our toothpaste, heavy metals in our deodorant, herbicides in the air we breathe, additives in our foods, synthetic hormones in our drinking water, harmful electromagnetic radiation in our homes and the list goes on.

We may reach a point where we have adapted to this environment of chemicals that are foreign to our body but we haven’t got there yet. We are succumbing more and more to symptoms produced by compromised detoxification systems such as poor digestion, headaches, depression and chronic fatigue.

'Tired all the time' (TATT) is one of the major reasons why people visit their doctor... We need to help our detoxification systems. We can do that by consciously reducing our toxin exposure, being mindful of everything we put into our mouth or on our skin. Indeed a good rule of thumb would be not to put anything onto our skin that we are not prepared to put into our mouth! Nourishing the body as well will provide those systems with the raw materials they need to perform their tasks. Food is our medicine.

Fleur and Cherie will be holding a detox and revitalise your body workshop on Saturday 21 June, from 1-4pm. Early bird offer of £40, if booked before 15 June (normal price £45).


For appointments with Fleur at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy, call us on 020 8789 3881 or send us an email at info@putneyclinic.co.uk.



Fleur Borrelli (Nutritionist)
W:Nutrition and superfood
N: Nutrition and superfood newsletters
T: 07766 88 35 22
E: fleur@nutritionandsuperfood.co.uk


21 June 2013

Top tips for staying young

by Fleur Borrelli, Nutritionist

Here are some excellent tips to help you stay young.

  • Aerobic exercise
  • Exercise on an empty stomach
  • Eat plenty of vegetables and fruit
  • Avoid environmental chemicals
  • Eat whole foods
  • Live!
  • Laugh!
  • Love!

For more information or appointments, you can contact Fleur at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy on 0208 789 3881 or send an email to info@putneyclinic.co.uk or visit our website.

Nutrition and Superfood website: www.nutritionandsuperfood.co.uk
Telephone: 07766 883 522 for a free consultation.

20 June 2013

Fitness and the mitochondria

by Fleur Borrelli, Nutritionist

How effective we are at exercising aerobically all depends on our mitochondria. Mitochondria are little sub-units, known as organelles, inside our cells. These are the power-houses of the cell, the engines, where make most of our ATP which is the body’s energy currency is generated. Apart from producing energy for us, they coordinate other actions such as becoming a skin cell or a muscle cell. They also manage cell death which needs to occur in a way that does not cause collateral damage and can even be beneficial to us.

Our mitochondria are so vital to health that we need to treat them well. They are semi-autonomous and reproduce independently of the cells they live in a way that is very similar to a bug. In fact microbiologists believe that at the beginning of time they might have lived freely as bacteria, until they took up resident in larger cells. They even have their own DNA to produce proteins which help our cells to work.

When we engage in physical activity, they are working away for us so that we can keep on going. A quick sprint down the road will probably not be enough to need them but anything longer and they come into their own. Once we are moving at a slower pace, then we start to use our aerobic system which depends on oxygen reaching the muscles. Glucose, which is the body’s energy source, is broken down in the cell in a series of chemical reactions so that the mitochondria can generate lots of ATP with the help of oxygen. Typically the human body contains less than a hundred grams of ATP at any given time but because of a complex recycling system, we can use up to a hundred kilograms per day.

The more mitochondria we have, the more energy we can make and the fitter we become. Sadly as we age, this becomes more difficult and our poor old power houses become susceptible to free radical attack. If we are under pressure then the demand for energy can be too much for our recycling system and this can affect our stamina and performance. We then have to revert to using another energy system which can cause a build-up of acid and painful muscles. Other things can damage the mitochondria are nutrient deficiencies – particularly the B vitamins, toxins, bacteria and viruses.

One of the ways we can increase our mitochondria is through aerobic exercise. By exercising in this way, we produce free radicals known as Reactive Oxygen Species. It is these free radicals that send signals to the cell to say it needs to adapt to the demands being placed on it by increasing mitochondria and being more energy efficient. We can also help this by exercising on an empty a stomach as the more our cells realise that there are lean times and times of plenty, the more they have to step up to the plate.

For more information or appointments, you can contact Fleur at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy on 0208 789 3881 or send an email to info@putneyclinic.co.uk or visit the Putney Clinic website.

Nutrition and Superfood website: www.nutritionandsuperfood.co.uk
Telephone: 07766 883 522 for a free consultation.

21 November 2012

Berries are good for the brain

By Fleur Borrelli BSc Nuit med,BA Hons
Nutritionist at The Putney Clinic of Physical Therapy





























Berries contain plant chemicals known as polyphenols. These are found in vegetables and fruit as well as in coffee and cocoa. Recently one category of polyphenols (anthocyanins) found in strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries have attracted attention for enhancing cognitive function in the elderly. Whist it is still early days for any conclusive evidence, there is no harm in eating a handful per day,fresh or frozen.