Showing posts with label KPJAYI Mysore. Show all posts
Showing posts with label KPJAYI Mysore. Show all posts

22 February 2014

New asana new pain. Mysore.



Sharath said " new asana new pain" last week in conference, here in Mysore. Anyone who practises Ashatanga yoga can probably relate to this-I think practising some "old" asana's with a new approach can also create pain ( both physical and emotional)...in my experience if we stick with it, and trust in the process we can overcome some of of this pain ( both real and imagined) .....He also said he took two years with one pose-I would love to know what pose that was? but I am not quite brave enough to ask :-)

02 February 2014

I will survive... Mysore early led


I survived a 4.30 am led classes here in Mysore. Thats it! :-)

I missed last Sundays led class because I was still awake at 2am and due to get up at 3am (it didn't happen). So when my alarm went off at 3.15am and I had had at least 6 hours sleep, I was on it!

By the time I reached the shala at 3.45am-ish, there were lots of people sitting outside the gates in the road (yes, in the road).

I had been told there would be the "gate keepers", those who sit facing out into the crowd as though to keep a watchful eye on proceedings and the rest of us facing them as though expecting a sermon. It is a very surreal sight.

The calm friendly group sat peacefully together turns into something quite different as the shala lights come on and the gates are opened  (imagine the Harrods sales but with yoga mats instead of posh handbags).

I decided to put my mat in the lobby and not run the gauntlet of the shala. This turned out to be a great spot for me and was, in fact, the first place I ever practised at KPJAYI three years ago (although I noticed the bin that I banged my head on every time I jumped back has been relocated spoiling some of the fun  :-) ).

Sharath was not happy this morning and gave the "early birds" a ticking off for arriving at the shala at 3am for the 4.30am class. "You are bringing the street dogs and disturbing my neighbours. Don't come so early". I will never be one of these early birds... That I can guarantee!

01 February 2014

My week in Mysore

I have been here in Mysore at KPJAYI for 9 days now. This is my 3rd trip to Mysore and thus far my most introspective. The shala is VERY busy but the energy is quite calm. There are lots of students waiting in the lobby area to be called to practise in the morning, again a very calm and civil bunch of yoga students (or perhaps I am more calm and civil :-)).

Time is a funny thing here. No-one seems to stick to it. The cleaner said "I will come at 11am on Friday" she came at 1pm on Saturday. The man who fixed the internet problem said "Madam, I will come at 7.15pm on Friday"; he showed up at 10.15 on Saturday (at least the quarter past the hour was consistent in his case). Time goes really fast or incredibly slow; it can sometimes feel like a twilight zone.

Sharath is on excellent form; smiley and happy and moving around the shala in his usual nimble way. His mother Saraswarti no longer assists him in the main shala (although she still teaches in her own shala). I'm glad she gets a bit more "time out" as she has definitely earned it. What an amazing woman!

Here are some photos of my week. I have to include the obligatory cow shot, but the rest are just daily life in and around Goklam. Not a yoga student or a KPJAYI photo to be seen (Yet!)

















04 November 2013

Karandavasana by R. Sharath Jois in Mysore



Great clip of Sharath in the shala in Mysore-amazing how he is able to stay really focused whilst his son plays around a few feet away from him. I also thought it interesting how high he stays on his toes when he jumps back & rolls forward-thoughts on that anyone?

Thank you to Madeleine Warwick for sharing

01 October 2013

Sharath Jois yoga. Warrior 1 & 2




Interesting to see Sharath count into the pose, but not in the pose its self-same as Manju Jois did in a resent led class I attended.
This is exactly how I was taught this sequence by my teacher Nancy Gilgoff-I notice some teachers ( and students) go into a really deep Utkatasana. Lovely to see the shala in Mysore, sweated it out in that spot a few times myself :-)

12 May 2013

Yoga keep it in the family. Parampara?

My daughter has been practising yoga on and off for a number of years. She and my son grew up in a household where yoga is a way of life for me. I have never imposed yoga on my family, but I have to say I love having my daughter in my classes. She has started to have a much deeper understanding of yoga and this understanding is helping her through a very difficult and stressful period of time as she prepares for her degree show at Central Saint Martins in London.

I am currently her only yoga teacher but I am hoping she will be able to practice with my own teachers, Nancy Gilgoff and with Sharath Jois when they are in London over the summer.

I remember discussing with Nancy many years ago how it felt to see her daughter practising with her. She had said she always loved looking through her legs and seeing Vanessa on a mat beside her. Vanessa now assists her quite often when she is teaching around the world.

My daughter and I discuss yoga. All limbs. Not too much because in a way by trying to practice the other aspects of yoga in my own life,  my children have adopted the principles of the yama and niyama without even realising. It is in their bones. I am passing on what was given to me by my own teachers. While I am definitely not claiming to be a guru (see below), the linage from Krishnamachari through to my girl child continues; related to each other or otherwise.




Mysore practise together and then a bit of tuition on jumping forward and back.




The text on Parampara from KPJAYI Mysore

Parampara is knowledge that is passed in succession from teacher to student. It is a Sanskrit word that denotes the principle of transmitting knowledge in its most valuable form; knowledge based on direct and practical experience. It is the basis of any lineage: the teacher and student form the links in the chain of instruction that has been passed down for thousands of years. In order for yoga instruction to be effective, true and complete, it should come from within parampara. 
Knowledge can be transferred only after the student has spent many years with an experienced guru, a teacher to whom he has completely surrendered in body, mind, speech and inner being. Only then is he fit to receive knowledge. This transfer from teacher to student is parampara.
The dharma, or duty, of the student is to practice diligently and to strive to understand the teachings of the guru. The perfection of knowledge – and of yoga — lies beyond simply mastering the practice; knowledge grows from the mutual love and respect between student and teacher, a relationship that can only be cultivated over time. 
The teacher’s dharma is to teach yoga exactly as he learned it from his guru. The teaching should be presented with a good heart, with good purpose and with noble intentions. There should be an absence of harmful motivations. The teacher should not mislead the student in any way or veer from what he has been taught. 
The bonding of teacher and student is a tradition reaching back many thousands of years in India, and is the foundation of a rich, spiritual heritage. The teacher can make his students steady – he can make them firm where they waver. He is like a father or mother who corrects each step in his student’s spiritual practice. 
The yoga tradition exists in many ancient lineages, but today some are trying to create new ones, renouncing or altering their guru’s teachings in favor of new ways. Surrendering to parampara, however, is like entering a river of teachings that has been flowing for thousands of years, a river that age-old masters have followed into an ocean of knowledge. Even so, not all rivers reach the ocean, so one should be mindful that the tradition he or she follows is true and selfless. 
Many attempt to scale the peaks in the Himalayas, but not all succeed. Through courage and surrender, however, one can scale the peaks of knowledge by the grace of the guru, who is the holder of knowledge, and who works tirelessly for his students.