Showing posts with label Yoga and pregnancy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Yoga and pregnancy. Show all posts

04 July 2016

How yoga can help with a smoother birthing experience






How yoga can help with a smoother birthing experience.




             
Babies that are well positioned in a woman's pelvis at the end of her pregnancy can have a major influence on her birthing experience and the way her baby is born. A lot of women will work up to 36 weeks in pregnancy, often seated at a desk leaning back in the chair. This seated position can cause the heaviest part of the baby ( the back of the body) to fall towards the woman's spine in the Occipital posterior position (OP) or back to back as it is sometimes called.


Occipital Anterior position (OA)

Babies in the Occipital Anterior (optimal fetal position) have an easier passage through the pelvis. Women delivering in the Occipital Anterior position tend to have shorter and more comfortable labours, with rapid cervix dilation and efficient contractions. There is less likelihood of medical intervention or complications during the birthing process.



Occipital Posterior position (OP)

Babies that are in the Occipital Posterior (fetal back towards the mother's spine) have a much more difficult journey to make. Women delivering babies in an OP position tend to have 'back labour', longer deliveries and will sometimes need medical intervention to assist them.   



How can yoga help encourage a baby to rotate into optimal position?

Using yoga poses that are forward-leaning or that are on all fours, especially during the last six weeks of pregnancy (last two-three weeks with second and subsequent pregnancies) can help create space for a baby to move into an OA position. Yoga poses such as Cat position, hip rotations and pelvic floor rocking can all assist with this optimal fetal positioning and help assist babies on their journey into the world.

30 September 2013

Yoga for birth preparation.

How does this pregnancy yoga class differ from a general prenatal yoga class? Diane King our specialist teacher explains.

Yoga for birth preparation classes
Diane’s  Yoga for birth preparation classes are tailored for the final stages of pregnancy (From 32 weeks), where what we need most is to quieten the mind, let go of time pressures and constant doing and be in a consciously relaxed state, where we can connect with ourselves, our babies and our inner birthing wisdom.
The course runs over four weeks and each week a different topic is discussed at the start of class:
Week 1: The natural physiology of birth – What to expect at different stages of the labour process
Week 2: Managing fear – Trusting your body and nurturing a sense of empowerment
Week 3: Creating a positive intention and guided relaxation – Letting go of the intellect and connecting with intuition and instincts
Week 4: Using breath as your anchor in labour – Detailed breath techniques for the different stages of labour
After the initial discussion, the session becomes more body focused, incorporating yoga postures that can help move the labour process along and build an inner and outer strength, to support a women along the course of her labour. The class ends with a restorative relaxation, fully supporting the mum to be, so they can let go and connect with their inner self and their babies. Above all, the class aims to nurture a sense of community and sharing in the final stages of pregnancy to support women as they approach their birth and enter into motherhood.

To find out more www.yogamama.co.uk or contact The Putney clinic 0208789 3881


16 July 2009

Yoga and pregnancy

Pregnancy is a great personal journey for any woman and is a time of mental and physical change. It can also be a challenging time, as adjustments need to be made as the body starts to change shape.

A pregnancy yoga practice can help address some of these changes in a positive way. Women who practice yoga during pregnancy are able to be really present in their bodies and connect with their unborn child. Yoga has a calming effect on the mother, which is, in turn, transmitted to the baby.

Breathing techniques learnt in prenatal yoga can be used at anytime during pregnancy and many women find them very useful when giving birth. Focusing on the breath can have a profound effect; by learning to control breathing a women can feel empowered and more in control of her thoughts and her body.

Pregnancy yoga differs from general yoga classes, in that many of the classical poses are adapted to accommodate changes in the body. Twists are open, poses are fluid and nurturing for the mum-to-be, creating space in the body and helping to alleviate some of the common ailments often associated with pregnancy such as backache, heartburn, swollen limbs etc.

By practising yoga, the body is strengthened and toned; and many women find that it takes them less time to regain their shape and fitness after giving birth. On top of this, spending time in a pregnancy yoga class with other women can be an emotionally bonding experience and many friendships are formed at this time.


Q. When can I start prenatal yoga

A. During the first trimester, less is best, as the body is adapting to the changes in hormones and your baby is fast developing. Breathing techniques are encouraged and rest is very important at this stage. Fatigue can sometimes be overwhelming and allowing yourself to rest can be challenging in itself. For all these reasons, many yoga teachers and the British Wheel of Yoga recommend starting yoga after the sixteenth week of pregnancy.

Q. Do I need to have practiced yoga before?

A. It is not necessary to have any prior knowledge or experience with yoga before joining a prenatal yoga class.

Q. can I practice yoga with SPD or groin pain?

A. You can practice yoga with these conditions and there are some poses that are beneficial to them. However, always consult your teacher and inform them before you attend class and they will give you appropriate poses to practice.

Q. Can I practice yoga with back pain?

A. Yes, you can practice yoga with back pain provided it is not acute. Many poses are very effective in helping ease back pain. Always consult your yoga teacher before class.

Q. When should I stop prenatal yoga?

A. Many women continue to practice yoga up until shortly before their babies are born.

Q. What should I wear ?

A. Loose, comfortable clothing is required.